Saturday, 19 August 2017

Ben's Bike for Brighton Big Dog

Brighton Big Dog is all about the climbs. Sure this means there is an equal amount fo sweet descents, but these are more flowing and aren't particularly techincal. A lightweight hardtail is the weapon of choice on such a climbers course. Sure you could argue that over six hours a full suspension bike will reduce fatigue as you hammer over a gazillion roots. However, if you want pure speed I think a weight weenie race bike will get you round the 6 mile course faster every time.

For 2017 I'm still riding my S-Works Stumpjumper, the medium frame weighing just over 1kg. Up front are the 100mm travel DT Swiss OMP O.L.D Race forks, which are buttery smooth, weigh less than two full water bottles and can be locked out via the neat bar remote when stonking on the pedals up a climb.

Such are the severity of a couple of the climbs that this is one of those rare occasions where I use the lowest gear. Since Switzerland last summer I have been running a 30t Absolute Black oval chainring paired with a 10-42 cassette at the rear.

Tyres are another area to save weight and reduce rolling resistance. I have reviewed the Vittoria Peyote on my blog previously and love the confidence and predictability it provides up front. I'm a recent convert to the rediculously skinny and low profile Specialized Renegade, but I have been impressed. Early in the race when it was still a bit greasey under the trees I had to observe a little caution on the descents, but it rolled fast everywhere else. Be warned I opted for the Control casing, the lighter S-Works is a little fragile and prone to punctures.

XTR brakes, shifters and rear mech peformed faultlessly as usual. I pinch a few grams back by using Hope floating disc rotors, there are even lighter options out there, but I haven't found one that offers the stopping power and control of the Hopes.

I've got a 17 degree negative rise Ritchey WCS stem to slam the 680mm Pro handlebar as low as it can go. Lightweight carbon rims on Stans hubs, built up by Darren at Strada wheels keep the weight to a minimum, but are reliable and easy to maintain.

Hanging under the Phenom saddle is a saddle bag. Largely due to laziness, unusually I carried two inner tubes where I'd normally have saved a few grams and left the second in the pit area. Packed in with the tubes were two tyre levers, a Topeak chain tool and SRAM chain link. I carried a Lezyne pump in my jersey pocket and left the CO2 cannister at home this time to make room for the second tube. 


She's a lightweight beauty and she didn't skip a beat the entire race.

1 comment: